§04-15 Mickey Lazarus

By Levi Clancy for לוי on
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AN INTERVIEW
WITH
MICKEY LAZARUS
BY
BRETT LAZARUS

"MICKEY -- THE MUSICIAN"

May 30, 1977

Myron Herbert "Mickey" Lazarus was interviewed by his grandson, Brett Lazarus, when Mickey was 75 years old. The interview took place at the home of Mickey and Louise Lazarus, 447 Lee Street, Oakland, California. The purpose of the interview was to set down the historical record of the musical career of Mickey. Brett then transcribed the interview into this written record.

BIOGRAPHIC SUMMARY

1902 Born in Leeds, England on February 22
1910 Started playing violin
1912 Started playing clarinet, gave up violin
Joined the Russian Juvenile Concert Band
1920 Moved to the United States
1925 Began playing clarinet professionally
1926 Married Louise Della Ramos
1928 T and D Theatre (Vaudeville Theatre in Oakland)
1932 Beginning of Band and McFadden's Ballroom in Oakland
1935 Went to Hollywood to work
1940 Stopped playing clarinet professionally
1941-1969 Owned "Music Bar & Gift Shop" in Oakland
1970 Retired


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AN INTERVIEW WITH MICKEY LAZARUS

Brett: Mickey, can you give me any background information about where you were born and what brought you to the states?

Mickey: I was born in 1902 in England. When I was ten years old, I'd been taking violin lessons at my dad's request. Then we moved to, migrated to, Toronto, Canada. He thought it was a good idea to present me to an orchestra1 [Young boys band, Toronto, Canada] of some kind and to further my knowledge and experience and education as a musician. He went to a band director and said, "My son plays the violin and I'd like to have him join your band." And the director said, "We can't use violins." The band director looked at my fingers and said, "Throw the violin away, you look like a clarinet player."

Brett: So, that's what started you playing the clarinet?

Mickey: Right.

Brett: Mickey, how long did you stay up in Canada?

Mickey: We were there for eight years with this band that I joined.

Brett: That makes you about 18 when you came down to the United States.

Mickey: Right.

Brett: What experiences did you come up against as a musician?

Mickey: Oh, lots of different things, such as joining a circus, playing in a circus band, playing in a concert band which was finally formed after six years of preparation.

Brett: Did you play in restaurants and small places like that?

Mickey: When I came to the United States from Canada, we played in dance ballrooms, in nightclubs and theaters. In 1925, I was one of the fortunate ones to have a contract signed for $100 a week, which was an unheard of amount of money at that particular time, and a 17 week contract at the Fiorde Italian Restaurant2 [Fiorde Italian Restaurant, San Francisco, California].

Brett: What type of music were you playing there?

Mickey: It was dance music. Entertainment for dinner dances.

Brett: Were you by yourself or did you have a band by that time?

Mickey: No, I would join the band.

Brett: I understand that in 1928, you had gone on to the T and D Theater3 [T and D Threare[sic], Oakland, California]. Where is the T and D Theater?

Mickey: Well, they were stage presentations rather than vaudeville; it was a stage production like Fanchon and Marco5 [Fanchon and Marco, a dancing team like Astaire and Rogers] or the days of ballroom dancing and stage productions.

Brett: Did you leave the T and D Theater and go on to other theaters or was that your main theater? What was the situation behind that?

Mickey: I left the T and D Theater and made the circuit of all the theaters in the area, and of all the musicians and bands. And, at that time, there was an opportunity for me to form my own band at the Original Sweets Ballroom6 [Sweets Ballroom, name before McFaddens, located in Oakland, Ca], which later became McFadden's Ballroom7 [McFaddens Ballroom, in Oakland, California. Much like discoteques today.] in 1931. At that time, I proved my ambition to be a band leader and the crowd accepted me as the dance band of the time.


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Brett: Okay, stop right there. Tell me about the band. Did you send out notices to musicians that you wanted to get a band together or how did that all come about?

Mickey: I selected the musicians of my acquaintance that I felt would be beneficial to the combination I had in mind. After many efforts of selecting the group, many changes were made, until I thought I'd reached my desires for an orchestra and, after a few weeks, the crowd had accepted what I desired to do.

Brett: These musicians that you were playing with were people that you'd already been playing with around the area?

Mickey: Yes, that's true; my acquaintances as musicians in the union.

Brett: Then it was your leadership that brought these people together and the crowd accepted what you had put together. Did it catch on at first? What was the crowd's reaction?

Mickey: Well, it took quite a while to attract a crowd with the competition in the area, the other orchestras that had been established and it was quite hard to sway them to the other ballroom.

Brett: So inevitably, you had to use some sort of a gimmick. Did you use advertising or what?

Mickey: Well, we used every means of attracting the crowd, such as novelty numbers and dance numbers that we thought they would like to listen to rather than the competition that were playing the old-fashioned, cut and dried.

Brett: So you were playing the new material that was coming out at the time and keeping up with the times?

Mickey: Right, we established a way that we thought they would accept rather than fifty year old styles.

Brett: When you first opened the ballroom, how did you feel about it? Did you feel that it was going to succeed or did you feel that you had to make it succeed?

Mickey: I felt that with my efforts, I would prove that I was able to make it succeed and prove that it was right. The proof of that was that I would present the vocalists and the orchestra for the first time in the history of the Oakland area, California. I had three vocalists, two girls and a boy singer. The crowd thought that was very unusual and they accepted it quite well.

Brett: So, you were the first one to have singers in your orchestra?

Mickey: In this area.

Brett: I remember you telling me that Tony Martin had sung in your orchestra. Was that at this time?

Mickey: No, his brother was the vocalist in the family and Tony hadn't been made, hadn't been a singer at the time but he asked me if he could sing in my band and I said, "No, we have your brother as a vocalist and we're very satisfied," and, at the time, he was taking saxophone lessons from me as a musician and when he asked if he could sing in the band, I said I didn't think he should. I thought he had better stick with the saxophone because I didn't think he was going to make it as a vocalist. I was wrong!

Brett: How did the crowd take it at first? Were there a lot of people at the beginning, or just a few?


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Mickey: The attendance was very poor in the beginning due to the money. At 40¢ they could hardly afford to go to the dances as we had expected them to come seven nights a week. So it took a while to realize that this is the way they should be going.

Brett: Was that the thing to do in those days -- to go dancing every night?

Mickey: No, it wasn't actually every night although the ballrooms were open every night. They tried to cater to different age groups.

Brett: Did you mainly cater to one age group or did you change from night to night?

Mickey: We changed from night to night to try to satisfy most every age group and it was not easy and we tried awfully hard.

Brett: What was the average age group of the people attending the dance?

Mickey: Well, they were strictly teenagers -- nineteen, twenty years old and I think that was about the average age of the dancers.

Brett: I assume you were able to bring in older people as well?

Mickey: We catered to a certain night of the week that was old-fashioned dancing, as they called it, or folk dancing. So, we were quite spread out in different types of entertaining the public.

Brett: Back to what you said about the first night that you opened when you opened up and there weren't too many people there. How did you feel as a musician? I know that music is an art and the audience can enhance your playing. How did you feel about that? Were you able to play up to what you felt was par or did you have problems with that?

Mickey: No, it didn't affect me at all because I knew that in a matter of time, it would catch on as I predicted and I wasn't disturbed by the attendance in the crowd.

Brett: And, it did catch on? Within a couple of weeks?

Mickey: Right.

Brett: That's great. After McFadden's Ballroom, where did you go from there?

Mickey: [In 1935] I went to Hollywood, NBC, and I thought I would try my ambitions in the Hollywood direction as a musician and see what they had to offer and to see if I had anything to offer them.

Brett: Now, when you say you were working for NBC, was that the radio station at NBC?

Mickey: That was the radio station at NBC.

Brett: What were your expectations? As just a musician or to continue as a band leader?

Mickey: No. I was satisfied to find out, as a musician, and eventually if I saw the opportunity, I might create a band of my own, at that particular time I was interested in a livelihood rather than the glory of what I wanted to be. Trying to make a living, let's put it that way.

Brett: Can you give me some stories about NBC, some circumstances working with other musicians and the people in the profession?

Mickey: Well, it was quite an education due to the competition but I did learn a lot about the way the musician's life has to be leader, whether I liked it or not, and I was very fortunate to come up with the big broadcasting programs. My first experiences in NBC were at the opening show of the Edgar Bergen and Charlie McCarthy and W.C. Fields radio shows.


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Brett: And what part did you play on that?

Mickey: I was in the orchestra playing the lead alto in a forty piece orchestra, under the direction of someone whose name I can't remember.

Brett: Were there any particular times, working at NBC, that really stand out that you can remember?

Mickey: There was one quite unusual happening. Don Amiche, on the first night of this program (a series), came out about 15 or 20 minutes before the program started, as a dress rehearsal, and he played in the background and listened to the music.

Brett: What type of show was this?

Mickey: This was a first-nighter, the type of program like "As the World Turns", or those kinds of things. And the incident was quite humorous. He was going to sing about Mimi, as pertaining to the script, and he said "okay" and the music started to play and he said, "Wait a minute. That's not the Mimi I'm supposed to sing." It just so happens that there were two songs by the name of Mimi; one was called And Mimi and the other just Mimi. And we had the wrong music and it was 15 minutes before the show and the panic was on. I offered my ability, if you can call it that, and said, "Hold everything. In five minutes I'll rearrange the score to fit the situation." And five minutes later the music was corrected and Don Amiche said, "Okay, that's fine."

Brett: So, you had to rewrite the music right there on the spot, 15 minutes before you went on the air?

Mickey: Right.

Brett: Were there any other people that you had to work with where there were similar circumstances?

Mickey: Well, I was fortunate to be called to play the clarinet for Dorothy Lamour, doing her vocal.

Brett: I don't understand what you mean by her "vocal".

Mickey: She was doing her song and the script called for a clarinet in the background.

Brett: These were all radio shows?

Mickey: Radio shows. And I felt pretty proud being called upon and selected out of five saxophone players to play the background music for her, which was very interesting and very encouraging.

Brett: You also worked with Rubinoff?

Mickey: Yes, we worked with Rubinoff and we did the General Motors Program in 1937. It was quite an experience to see how the other conductors and NBC directors functioned and it was quite an education that I got from watching all these big fellows that felt they were big.

Brett: What was it like working for Rubinoff? Was he always cracking the whip?

Mickey: Yes, he would put everyone down to boost his own ego. He was very particular about precision and trying to prove that he knew all about it and he would belittle the men in the orchestra very badly. The men had no choice but to say, "Yes sir, yes sir, yes sir."

Brett: Did he actually do that to somebody?


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Mickey: He did that on one occasion where he was picking on a certain violinist and he stopped the band ten times and each time he moved the man down one chair. And he said, "Next week we won't need you." It was right in front of all the musicians.

Brett: Was the guy a poor musician?

Mickey: No, that's the conductor's ego. He's trying to satisfy his own ego and the sponsor's ego. By doing that, he felt he was using his ability to show how good he was.

Brett: Did you work for Rubinoff yourself?

Mickey: I did. I played saxophone in the orchestra.

Brett: Were you able to get along with him?

Mickey: Well, nobody got along okay with him. I didn't get along. I didn't suit him and nobody else did. There was one experience where he complained about the drummer up in the back of the bandstand and he kept stopping the band because the drummer was making unnecessary noises that weren't in the score. He said, "What is that boom, boom boom? That isn't in the script." He tried it about half a dozen times and he kept hearing it and he finally got off of his podium and he walked up to the drummer's platform and he said, "All right, let's start again." And there was no noise when he got there and he couldn't imagine what he was hearing but the drummer was taking a beating. So that was an occasion of the temperament of different conductors.

Brett: Was there one particular time, as you can recall, that stands out as being memorable, in a happy sense?

Mickey: I think I do remember an occasion -- when I was offered the opportunity to join the rehearsal group of musicians to the home of Sigmund Romberg, which I think you will remember, The Student Prince and all the Viennese music. And I looked forward to enjoying the acquaintance of the other side of the industries which would operate so that I might gain something from them. But, Sigmund, who was the world's greatest composer at that time...

Brett: How did you meet him in the first place?

Mickey: I met him through a contractor who engaged me. I met him as a musician, hired to play at his home. Not as a soloist but with a group of 30 musicians that he had engaged. He wanted to hear what he had written. He liked the play-back to hear what the composition sounded like.

Brett: So being a composer, he hired you and some other musicians to play his music?

Mickey: Right. And the experience that was outstanding to me, and the satisfaction that I derived from that, was that I felt not able to perform due to my associates that were the greatest musicians -- that I thought were greater. And it was quite a challenge to sit with that group. I felt that I shouldn't be there because my type of music was not...

Brett: Can you remember what you felt like when you were playing with these other musicians?

Mickey: I felt inferior to them. I felt that I did not belong and I expected any moment that someone would say we'll see you later or something like that.

Brett: And how did it turn out?

Mickey: It turned out surprisingly to my satisfaction. I felt about as tall as a giant when we got through.


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Brett: How did it happen that you became a giant?

Mickey: Well, that the experience I had -- Romberg -- I had heard some of his music, and I was the predominate lead of this particular composition and at the first effort I said to myself, "I've really got to hunch and crunch and really play it well." After three or four bars, Romberg tapped on his stand. He said, "Let's try that again." I didn't realize -- I assumed that he was directing at me. So I tried that much harder the second time. I played it with no remarks and Romberg stopped the music again and, at this particular passage, all the violinists, about ten violinists were in unison with me, and after four or five times starting over and over again -- and each time we played it I thought that I was in the wrong -- I didn't know how to correct it. So, after the sixth or seventh time, he stopped and said, "Violinists, will you please play it the way the saxophonist interprets it." That made me feel about as big as a giant and I couldn't believe that I was right and the others were wrong.

Brett: So, your interpretation of his music was just right for him?

Mickey: Apparently. And it established my confidence that I wasn't an underdog and, from then on, I felt quite a bit better about my efforts as a musician in Hollywood.

Brett: Did your attitude change towards the other musicians? Because you said that when you first got there, that they were superior to you and that you were inferior. Did your attitude change?

Mickey: Well, my attitude didn't change. I just felt equal to what Hollywood expected and, at that time, I said to myself, "Do I change my style or do I continue with my style of playing?" And I proved that I was on the right track.

Brett: How do you think the other musicians saw you?

Mickey: Well, I didn't seem to care. I didn't care what their thoughts were. I was just trying to find out what I had to offer and it proves that I was satisfied.

Brett: Were you making a lot of money at this time?

Mickey: No. The money was not the important thing. Just the experience of the way Hollywood would direct the musicians in the theatrical field. Naturally, it was a new field for me to study and I gained quite a bit from it.

Brett: So, would you say that this one experience gave you a change to really see what Hollywood was about?

Mickey: Not necessarily, but it established my confidence in myself through that experience.

Brett: So, it allowed you to go on to other experiences?

Mickey: Right. I felt more confident accepting the work that was offered.

Brett: What happened after that? Did you play with Romberg or did you move on?

Mickey: The thing that Romberg did not have was a steady job for me from day to day. He just had an occasional job and every time Romberg did have a job, he would ask for me.

Brett: Mickey, I would like to thank you for spending the time with me to do this interview and I am glad that you were fortunate enough to go through these experiences that you went through.

Mickey: Thank you very much. I enjoyed being with you and relating my experiences and I hope that you have enjoyed listening to me.


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[The footnotes listed on this page are embedded in the text above; however, footnote #4 is never listed. It goes from #3 to #5 in the text. Footnote 4: "Eddie Peabody, one of the big name bandleaders in the Bay Area"]

POSTSCRIPT

The Toronto Jewish Congress/Canadian Jewish Congress Ontario Region Archives, has requested photographic copies of the pictures of Mickey Lazarus in his days with the "Russian Juvenile Concert Band" of Toronto, Canada. Louise and Wayne Lazarus have the original photographs from which copies will be made.

A SHORT BIOGRAPHY OF MICKEY BY WAYNE LAZARUS: My father learned the violin in England. He was born in Leeds, then moved to Toronto and then to California. He was self-taught and could play any instrument. He had his own orchestra in Oakland and performed in movies and on radio in Hollywood. He didn't have formal training but could write the parts of the music for the whole orchestra by just listening to records.


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MYER "MYRON/MICKEY" LAZARUS WITH HIS VIOLIN IN A LEEDS STUDIO PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN WHEN HE WAS ABOUT NINE YEARS OLD, PROBABLY IN LATE 1911. SAM PICKED MICKEY AS THE FAMILY MUSIC STUDENT AND IT TURNED OUT TO BE A SOUND JUDGEMENT AS MICKEY MADE MUSIC HIS PROFESSION.


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A NOVEMBER 1916 PICTURE POSTCARD FROM TORONTO CANADA OF THE "RUSSIAN JUVENILE CONCERT BAND". MICKEY LAZARUS IS NEXT TO THE BASS DRUM WITH HIS CLARINET. THE POSTCARD WAS MAILED FROM JOSEPH LAZARUS TO BEN LAZARUS WHO EMIGRATED IN 1916.

[Postcard dated November 2 1916]
[Addressed to:
Mr. B lazarus
Box 43C Lemoore
California
U.S.A.]

Dear Bro Ben

Just a card to inquire why you don't write? I think it's time. We are now settled down at 86 Palmorton Ave and are all well how are you?

From Your Bro, Mother, Etc.

per Joe


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DR. STEPHEN SPEISMAN, DIRECTOR OF THE TORONTO JEWISH ARCHIVES, RESEARCHED THIS BAND AND SAID THE DIRECTOR WAS "IGNACZ GLASS".

MICKEY LAZARUS IS THE CLARINET PLAYER, SECOND FROM THE BASS DRUM IN THIS CA. 1916 RUSSIAN JUVENILE CONCERT BAND PHOTO, ISSUED BY THE ALEXANDRA STUDIO IN TORONTO AS A POST CARD.


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OAKLAND POST-ENQUIRER
Thursday, July 21, 1932

McFadden's Sets College Carnival Tomorrow Night
All is in readiness for the College Carnival night tomorrow evening at McFadden's ballroom, Nineteenth street and Broadway. Dancing has been announced until 12:30 by Mickey Lazarus, band leader.
Noisemakers, serpentine and fun machines are to be employed during the evening.
The College Carnival has been instituted to provide Oakland enjoyment for college students on Friday evenings, according to Laughlin.

LOTS OF LUCK
to
MICKEY LAZARUS
Tom & Ted's Eat Shoppe

Tom Coakley
and his
Athens Club Orchestra
join in wishing the best
of everything for
MICKEY LAZARUS
and
McFadden's Ballroom
Beautiful

Best Wishes
MICKEY LAZARUS
AND BAND BOYS
Day & Night Pharmacy
"WE NEVER CLOSE"

NEW LEADER at McFaddens' Ballroom Beaitiful, 1933 Broadway, which opens tomorrow night, "Mickey" Lazarus.

Band Leader Plays Many Instruments
Mickey Lazarus, the leader of the McFadden Ballroom Beautiful, is one of the most versatile musicians in the west.
He is equally at home with his red, white and blue clarinet, the saxophone, octarina, fife, musette, violin and marimbaphone.

Mickey Lazarus and his band open at McFadden's (formerly Sweet's) Ballroom beaitiful, on Broadway Friday night. Numerous radio prominents will be on hand. Jimmy Wheeler, banjoist with Lazarus, was formerly in Jean Wakefield's musical.

McFadden's Ballroom Opens

Mickey Lazarus Directs New Dance Band
Mickey Lazarus, with his famous red, white and blue clarinet, will conduct the new eleven-piece band, which is to play nightly at the McFadden's Ballroom Beautiful, which will be open to the public tomorrow night.
Betty Kelly, NBC star, is to be co-featured with Lazarus for the opening tomorrow night and will make a personal appearance at the new dance palace Saturday night.
Lazarus, one of the early radio personalities, has been a featured performer with Lynn Cowan, Max Bradfield, George Stoll and Oscar Preston.
He was with John Wolohan the opening night of the ballroom where he returns as leader tomorrow night. It was then "Sweet's."
The Lazarus orchestra includes Jimmy Wheeler, George Liddle, John Derning, Art Neuman, Ralph Hilton, Ed Werner, John Wesch, Dick Gordon, Al Carr and Babe Bowman.

Star Betty Kelly At New Ballroom
Betty kelly, who will sing with Mickey Lazarus' band at McFadden's Ballroom Beautiful, is an Oakland girl who rise to fame in the radio world has been one of [the] sensations of local radio history.
Starting as a child star with Brother Bobb on KTAB three years ago, she rose to the heights, and her voice today is known throughout the nation, through her singing on NBC chains.

Band Directors, Mayor at Opening
Mayor Fred N. Morcom and celebrities in the local music world will take a prominent part in the opening tomorrow night of McFadden's Ballroom Baeutiful, 1933 Broadway.
Hermie King of the Fox Oakland, Oscar Preston of the Orpheum, Tom Coakley of the Athens Club, Owen Sweeten of the Orpheum, and Jess Stafford of Sweet's Ballroom, are to be present.

"Mickey" Theme Song for Lazarus
"Mickey," the sensational song success of other years, will be the theme song of Mickey Lazarus and his band at McFadden's Ballroom Beautiful.
The song was dedicated to the late Mabel Norman, when she was starred in the moving picture "Mickey." It was written by an Oaklander, Neil Moret.

2000 Expected Tomorrow at Dance Hall
A crowd of nearly 2000 dancers is expected to throng McFadden's Ballroom Beaitiful, at 1933 Broadway, when the new palais de dance, formerly "Sweet's," opens its doors tomorrow night.
Redecorated throughout, thoroughly modernized, and with all new equipment and furniture, McFadden's will provide surprises and thrills for Oakland's dancers.
The manager, C. H McFadden, formerly was in charge of the Balconnades in San Francisco, was associated for a time with Neptune Beach and has operated with success the Jenny Lind hall, Pacific building, Maple Hall and Aahmes Temple ballrooms.
McFadden announces the engagement of Mickey Lazarus and his 11-piece band. The entire orchestra will play every night, with old-fashioned dancing on Tuesdays and Thursdays.

Welcome Mickey Lazarus and Band Boys
The Official Parking Station of McFadden's Ballroom Beautiful
CALIFORNIA AUTO LAUNDRY CO.
1940 Broadway 1924 Franklin
Washing, Polishing, Parking and
Complete Lubrication
PHONE HOL. 9274


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NOVEMBER 11, 1932
MICKEY CLUB FOR MUSIC
Hereafter the young members of the Post-Enquirer-Uptown theater Mickey Mickey Mouse club will not only have the opportunity to become singers, dancers or actors -- but artists or instrumental musicians as well!
This annonucement was made by Mickey Mouse himself today, after a conference with Mickey Lazarus, well known Oakland orchestra leader.
Both Mickeys took a liking to each other and this is what they decided:
Mickey Lazarus will bring his "California Bears" to the Mickey Mouse club meeting at the Uptown theater at College and Shafter avenues tomorrow, to play, and --
The club members will be given the chance to try out for places in a Mickey Mouse club band for boys and girls!
Mother Mouse also announces a drawing contest.
All the members need to do is look at the pictures of Mickey and Minnie Mouse in The Post-Enquirer, copy them as best they can, and turn in their pictures at the Saturday meetings. Prizes will be awarded.
The regular stage acts by club members will be on the program, as well as the four Marx Brothers in "Monkey Business."
A specially exciting serial picture, "Devil Horse," with thee leading role taken by a famous horse actor, will begin at tomorrow's show.

DANCE BAND TO PLAY ON SUNDAY AT IBERICO CLUB
A special treat for San leandro dancers will come here Sunday night when Mickey Lazarus and his versatile 10-piece band of musical comedians from McFadden's ballroom in Oakland will play at the Iberico club with the dance to start at 8 p. m., it was announced this week by Jesus Gil, chairman of the Iberico club entertainment committee.
A wealth of modern dance and comedy numbers are included in the repertoire of Mickey's band, and those who do not dance will be assured plenty of entertainment; and those who do enjoy the waltz will be more than satisfied, Gil said, as waltz music is one of the band's standard features.
While a large crowd is expected, Sunady's dance will be something in the nature of an experiment, Gil declared, for if it proves successful, Sunday night dancing will become a regular feature of the club with Lazarus' orchestra furnishing the rhythm.

Radio Stars Feature In Hotel Dinner Fete
The Hotel Carillon dining room in the Elks club building announces Mickey Lazarus and his orchestra as the feature of their European buffet dinner dance tonight. Hal Morris in the role of host, and a number of guest radio stars will assist.

DUGAN'S NITE CLUB
Park Avenue and Hollis -- Emeryville HU. 6010
FEATURING OUR ALL NEW
Continuous Floor Show
WITH ANN AND CHARLIE O'NEIL
AND THE SPICY-SAUCY DUGANETTES
Mickey Lazarus Music
OPEN ALL NITE
NO COVER OR MINIMUM CHARGE
FREE PARKING

JEWISH ASSOCIATION IN DUARTE BENEFIT
Plans have been completed by the East Bay auxiliary, Jewish Consumptive Relief and ex-Patients association, for its dance to be given in Hotel Leamington Sunday evening, according to Mrs. Merris Miller, general chairman.
Proceeds from the affair will be used for upkeep and enlargeemnt of the Duarte non-sectarian tubercular sanitraium.
The ballroom o the Leamington has been donated for the evening through the courtesy of Pat Shanley, manager. Mickey Lazarus and his orchestra will play. Entertainment features are planned.
Cooperating with Mrs. [illegible], Mrs. Harry J Berstein, Miss Gladys Happ, Joseph Frankel, [illegible] Dietz, Harry Landsman, Mis Chivley Kapzoff and Mesdames Benjamin Gubin, Benjamin Feinstein, B. Rosen, Harry Hagal, Morris Fasse, [illegible] Krinsky, [illegible, Louis or Louie] Grimes and Jacob Gold.

New Stars in Dugan's Show
Charlie and Ann O'Neil, popular dance team, head the new floor show at Dugan's, Park avenue and Hollis street.
The O'Neils are famous for their "Doll dance," "Parade of the Wooden Soldiers" and their many novelties. Appearing with them are the Duganettes, Dot May, Yvonne Meyers and Mabell Lane, dancing beauties.
Music is provided by Mickey Lazarus and his popular tunesters.


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